DISCRIMINATION

Discrimination

aidslaw.ca/discrimination

Discrimination

Overview

HIV-related stigma and discrimination are an everyday reality. Stigma and the fear of discrimination often stop people from seeking to be tested for HIV, or from acknowledging their HIV status publicly. People living with, or suspected of having, HIV are sometimes denied treatment by medical practitioners, housing by landlords, and jobs by employers. They may sometimes be shunned by their families, friends and colleagues, turned down for insurance coverage, or refused entry into foreign countries.

We work with people and organizations from across Canada and around the world to ensure that the human rights of people living with, or vulnerable to, HIV are recognized, respected and protected — including the right to freedom from discrimination.

Reducing the stigma and discrimination surrounding HIV is key to both stopping the spread of the epidemic and improving the quality of life of people living with the disease. The perception of HIV as a disease affecting only, or primarily, groups such as gay men, sex workers or people who use drugs can lead to little or no attention paid by governments to the disease. Yet, governments have a legal responsibility to take action, and everyone has a role to play.


Recomendaciones a Canadá: Presentación al Comité de la ONU para la Eliminación de la Discriminación Racial

Las minorías raciales son desproporcionadamente acusadas, procesadas y encarceladas en Canadá usando leyes que criminalizan a las personas que usan drogas y quitándoles sus derechos a un trato igualitario en el sistema de justicia, a su seguridad como persona y a los servicios de salud y sociales. El hecho que Canadá no ofrezca a los […]

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Recommendations to Canada: Submission to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination

Racialized communities are disproportionately charged, prosecuted and incarcerated in Canada under laws that criminalize people who use drugs, depriving them of their rights to equal treatment in the justice system, to security of the person, and to health and social services. Canada’s failure to provide prisoners, who are disproportionately Indigenous and Black, with equivalent access […]

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Review of Canada’s Compliance with the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

“The Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network submits this briefing to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in advance of its review of the periodic report of Canada, held during its 93rd session from July 31 to August 25, 2017. “[T]he Legal Network has focused this briefing on its concerns about Canada’s implementation of […]

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List of Issues Prior to Reporting: Canada’s Compliance with the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

“In advance of the adoption of the List of Issues Prior to Reporting for Canada’s periodic review under the UN Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (‘Convention’), to be held during its 93rd session from 31 July to 25 August 2017, the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network (‘Legal Network’) would like to provide […]

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Reducing stigma and discrimination through the protection of privacy and confidentiality

This resource explains the important role of privacy and confidentiality in reducing stigma and discrimination related to STBBIs, and offers frontline health and social service providers several strategies they can use to deal with issues related to privacy, confidentiality, the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure and stigma reduction.

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Letter to Toronto Police Services Board RE: Request for Feedback on Police “Street Checks”

The Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network wishes to add our voice to the many calling for the immediate abolition of all aspects of “street checks” or “carding” used by the Toronto Police Service (TPS).

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Review of Canada’s Compliance with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

“The Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network submits this briefing to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in advance of its review of the periodic report of Canada, held during its 17th session from 20 March to 12 April 2017. “In this submission, the Legal Network sets out some selected concerns about the implementation […]

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Legal Network Welcomes Canada’s Commitment To Redress Discrimination Against LGBTQI People

November 15, 2016 — The Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network welcomes Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s announcement today to appoint a Special Advisor on LGBTQ2 issues who will work with Egale Canada Human Rights Trust and other stakeholders to address the urgent human rights and public health issues outlined in The Just Society Report.

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Factum of the Interveners at the Supreme Court of Canada: R. v. Lloyd

“Globally, prisons disproportionately incarcerate people from marginalized communities, who, in turn, are disproportionately affected by conditions such as drug dependence, HIV, and hepatitis C virus. … Section 5(3)(a)(i)(D) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (the “MMS Provision”) mandates that the persons to whom it applies serve a one year prison sentence, whatever their health condition. The […]

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HIV stigma and Charlie Sheen’s outing: things to remember

November 17, 2015 In a television interview this week, actor Charlie Sheen revealed he is living with HIV, claiming that part of his reason for doing so is to put an end to years of rumours as well as extortion through threats of revealing his status. His revelation has prompted a flurry of media attention […]

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In Conversation with … Ron Rosenes

Ron Rosenes is a member of the Legal Network’s Advocates Circle and a past Vice Chair of the Canadian Treatment Action Council who has been working on HIV-related issues for more than twenty-five years. He was recently awarded the Order of Canada for his community work. How have your background and lived experience influenced your […]

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Know Your Rights

This series of 8 brochures (now available in 7 languages, including Arabic, Chinese and Spanish) addresses the privacy rights and disclosure obligations of people living with HIV in a variety of day-to-day contexts.

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Judging the epidemic: A judicial handbook on HIV, human rights and the law

Judging the epidemic has been prepared as a resource to help judges, magistrates, arbitrators and other judicial officers throughout the world adjudicate cases involving HIV-related issues. This handbook may also be used by judicial trainers and ministries of justice to deliver educational programmes to judges and magistrates on legal issues related to HIV and human […]

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